Faster than wifi is the Li fi technology based internet.

li fi based internet

After the accidental invention of wifi in 1992, we got another invention in 2011 that caused another advancement in the technological sector.Invented in 2011 by Harald Haas from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, Lifi technology based internet is a technology that uses light rather than radio waves to transfer internet data, and the frequency of light has a range that is 10,000-times greater than radio waves. Which means with Li-Fi to download a full-length HD movie it would take just a few movements.

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One of the reasons why light is a defining technology for the century ahead is simply that there’s nothing faster than it. As can be seen in optic fiber-based networks.

Dr. Harald Haas demonstrated the potential of this technology by streaming a video with a lightbulb.

Li-Fi transmits data using LED lights, which flicker on and off within nanoseconds, imperceptible to the human eye. This technology has been able to reach a mindblowing 224 Gbps speed.

Unlike Wi-Fi signals which can penetrate walls, Li-Fi is based on light and can’t, so its range is theoretically more limited. However, because of that limit, Li-Fi is also potentially more secure from external sniffing.

Another advantage is that There’s no interference with electromagnetic waves, meaning it could be used in airplanes and in surgeries.



 

The world might eventually in the coming years have to shift its reliance from Wi-Fi to Li-Fi, and we already have got pioneers.Velmenni, and several other companies have already sprung up to bring Li-Fi to customers, like Oledcomm and pureLiFi, the latter established by Li-Fi’s inventor himself, Harald Haas.Both companies offer kits to early adopters to install Li-Fi networks in the office and home, and pureLiFi claims speeds of 10 Mbps with its current offering.Velmenni also took the technology out of the labs and into real-world offices and industrial environments in Estonia, where it was able to achieve good speeds.

SEE ALSO: He Won $250,000 for Explanation Of Einstein’s Special Theory Of Relativity.

Watch Haas talking about the technology in 2011:

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Sources/references

  • Images used above licensed under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license

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